Husband shows devotion for wife during family crisis

Husband shows devotion for wife during family crisis

Katu news recently honored Edwin Young of Portland in its “everyday heroes” feature. Edwin has demonstrated remarkable devotion to his wife, Jovan, while she has struggled to recover from a mysterious illness which confined her to the hospital for several months.

Doctors have been unable to provide Jovan with a specific diagnosis, and although she has been released from the hospital, she can’t walk, and requires extra care from her husband. “Edwin cooks my food,” Jovan told Katu. “He helps me change my bed if I need to change my bed; he washes all of my laundry; he does the dishes.”

Edwin Young has fulfilled his new responsibilities with remarkable grace and dedication. “Without even irritation, this man takes care of me,” Jovan marveled. She calls Edwin a superhero, but he feels that he has simply done his duty to his wife and children: “I’ve got to [take care of her]” he explained. “I have to. We’ve got daughters and they’re there [at home] too, but they’ve got lives. . . . And we don’t want to take their lives from them.”

The Young family has created a GoFundMe page to help cover Jovan’s medical expenses. To support Edwin in his effort to care for his wife, click here.

Young cancer patient receives matching doll thanks to stranger’s generosity

Young cancer patient receives matching doll thanks to stranger’s generosity

Dylan Probe isn’t letting cancer slow her down. She competed as a triathlete, finishing three races before her 10th birthday, until doctors found a tumor in her left foot last year. They diagnosed Dylan with Ewing Sarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer which affects 200 children in the US annually.

Dylan’s cancer did not spread, but she lost one leg to amputation, and endured chemotherapy harsh enough to keep her home from school due to a weakened immune system. “If you want a fever, go to school,” Dylan explained.

Although cancer has limited Dylan’s mobility, it has not conquered her indomitable spirit. “Her very first night in the hospital,” said Megan Probe, Dylan’s mom, “we sat down and we had a conversation. [Dylan] said, ‘You know what, Mommy? Cancer’s not going to win no matter what.’ I said, ‘What do you mean?’ She goes, ‘Well either I’ll be cured or I’ll go to heaven. Either way, I win.'”

Photographer Sherina Welch recently completed a childhood cancer photo project titled “More than Four,” which features Dylan’s story. When Welch initially heard about Dylan, she decided to send her a surprise gift: an American Girl doll with a prosthetic left leg like Dylan’s artificial limb. “I love it!” Dylan exclaimed after Welch delivered the doll.

Though Dylan welcomed the gift, she isn’t asking people for anything special. “You don’t have to know me,” she explained. “You don’t have to have anything to do with me. You just have to believe.”

Nonagenarian honored for decades-long service to home-bound in Portland

Nonagenarian honored for decades-long service to home-bound in Portland

Last month, KATU news honored 91-year-old Jean Pierce in its “Everyday Heroes” feature for her longtime service to Portland. Pierce has volunteered for Store to Door, a nonprofit which delivers groceries to seniors and individuals with disabilities, for over three decades.

Pierce believes her biweekly shopping trips for Store to Door have enabled her to remain mobile into her ninth decade. “I credit the fact that I’m still moving around on doing this,” she explained.

Store to Door’s 400 volunteers strive to foster relationships with the customers they serve. According to Executive Director Kiersten Ware, these relationships help the organization meet clients’ needs: “We know our clients . . . so they’re more likely to tell us if they have an additional need,” Ware said.

Ware believes Pierce embodies Store to Door’s commitment to the home-bound. “If you were to ask me if there was a hero, someone I would want to follow in their footsteps, I would say it’s Jean [Pierce],” she said.

Store to Door volunteers will continue to have a role model in Pierce–despite her age, she intends to continue serving her community as long she can. “It makes me feel good to be doing something for somebody else,” she told KATU. “That’s it.”

Oregon state troopers save ducklings from storm drain

Oregon state troopers save ducklings from storm drain

Oregon police officers rescued two ducklings from a Salem storm drain, where they were trapped for several days. “Fish and Wildlife Division Senior Trooper Hunter (Salem Area Command) and Recruit Denny (OSU Patrol Office) were dispatched to a call of several baby ducklings trapped in a storm drain at the corner of Airport Road and Mission Street in Salem, Oregon,” the Oregon State Police Facebook page stated.

According to witnesses, a mother duck attempted to cross a street with her ten ducklings, when two of them fell through a grate and disappeared into the drain.

City workers contributed to the rescue operation, and removed storm grates and a manhole cover so the officers could lift the ducklings to safety in a net. The ducklings rejoined their mother and eight siblings in a nearby canal.

OSP’s Facebook page noted that individuals from several government departments–including Salem’s Public Works Department and ODOT–cooperated with the officers to assist the ducks. The page described the incident with the hashtag, “#Teamwork.”

Kelso students help teacher buy a new set of wheels

Kelso students help teacher buy a new set of wheels

When Kelso, Washington students heard that their teacher needed a new wheelchair, they decided to act. The students organized a GoFundMe campaign to purchase a new electric wheelchair for substitute instructor John Jankins. An overwhelming response from donors enabled them to collect over $32,000 in less than one week.

Jankins, who is affected by cerebral palsy, rides his motorized wheelchair to and from Kelso High School, where he has worked for almost thirty years. Jankins’ students couldn’t imagine Kelso High without him: “Rain or shine Mr. Janke has been a part of Kelso classrooms for years. His presence has touched the lives of countless students/staff and now it’s time to show our appreciation,” the students’ GoFundMe page read.

The students initially aimed to raise $25,000, but an outpouring of support for Jankins prompted the students to increase their fundraising goal to $30,000. Extra funds will cover the cost of future wheelchair repairs.