Oregon Student Makes Miraculous Recovery After Near-Fatal Accident

Oregon Student Makes Miraculous Recovery After Near-Fatal Accident

After three months in the hospital, Bobby Asa, a seventeen-year-old Sam Barlow High School student, finally returned home.

On June 27th, Bobby was driving home after visiting a friend, when another driver rear-ended his car. Bobby lost consciousness after the impact of the collision fractured his skull and damaged his spinal cord. He didn’t wake until six months later.

Doctors told Bobby’s family he would likely never walk again. But, after being released from Randall Children’s Hospital last Friday, he is already proving them wrong: “Walking is good. I’m getting to relearn it and learning how to be in a wheelchair, so relearning, kind of, life again,” Bobby told KOIN reporters.

Bobby hasn’t allowed his struggles to embitter him. In fact, his recovery has taught him important lessons: He values life more than ever before, because he now realizes “it can be taken away just like that. That’s what I think mostly, and not taking stuff for granted is what I want to do now.”

Last weekend, Bobby’s family celebrated his return home with an open house to thank friends and neighbors for their support. Nearly 200 people attended the event. “I just want to say, like, thank you to everyone who helped,” Bobby said.

Bobby explained that he looked to his family and community for encouragement during his long recovery. However, he ultimately credits his astounding progress to something else. “Well, I think it is a miracle because, like, right now, I shouldn’t even be doing what I’m doing,” he stated. “I should be in bed right now, but I’m not. So that’s great.”

Innovative Restaurant Model Serves up Affordable Dining Experience for the Needy

Innovative Restaurant Model Serves up Affordable Dining Experience for the Needy

A motivated quintet of local community advocates and business owners plans to offer Willamette Valley residents a new dining experience. The group intends to open a for-profit restaurant, dubbed “Food for Thought Cafe and Infoshop,” in downtown Salem. There, diners will be able to sample locally-sourced, multi-cultural cuisine–but at a fraction of the price other restaurants might charge.

What will guarantee the restaurant’s affordable offerings? A pay-what-you-want business model which allows customers to pay according to their financial means.

Michele Darr, a board member of Food for Thought Cafe, isn’t worried about maintaining a steady revenue stream. “We believe we have a bullet-proof business and sustainment plan,” she told Helen Caswell of Salem Weekly. Darr’s fellow board member, Amanda Hinman, points to Panera Bread Company’s successful pay-what-you-want experiment in Dearborn, Michigan: the project “helped Panera build a long-term strategy devoted to maintaining a loyal return customer base and is serving as a roadmap for others,” Hinman explained.

Jessica Parks directs a pay-what-you-want cafe in Kirskville, Missouri. Parks admits that obtaining financial support from donors constitutes a major challenge for the business: “People were very skeptical at first.” But, she continued, “once they come, taste our food and see it in action they keep coming back.” About 9 in 10 customers at Parks’ restaurant pay the suggested amount for their meals.

For Darr, the pay-what-you-want model is about giving the needy access to an experience which they otherwise would not be able to afford. “Giving low-income people the chance to eat a nutritious sit-down meal somewhere other than a soup kitchen helps [all people] remember that we aren’t strangers, or forgotten citizens . . . we are neighbors,” she said. Darr and her colleagues hope to offer classes and study spaces at their restaurant in addition to tasty cuisine. Ultimately, they aim to create a vibrant community atmosphere which will uplift the needy and transform the way society currently views food assistance.

Darr and her fellow board members welcome donations for Food for Thought Cafe at their GoFundMe page.

Local Non-profit Donates Unused Food to Needy

Local Non-profit Donates Unused Food to Needy

Salem Harvest, a local non-profit, has a plan to reduce food waste and help the hungry. The organization “connects farmers and backyard growers with volunteer pickers” who gather produce which would otherwise go unused, writes Tom Hoisington of Salem Weekly. Salem Harvest then distributes the food free of charge to low-income families, the unemployed, the elderly, and other needy individuals.

According to Hoisington, the organization has collected over one million pounds of fruits and vegetables for the Marion-Polk Food Share and other local food banks since 2010, and boasts 2,600 volunteers. Thus, Salem Harvest is well-equipped to meet Oregon’s exceptional needs: more children, as a percentage of the population, experience hunger here than in any other state.

Salem Harvest benefits not only those who receive produce, but also those who give their time to harvest it. “Harvests offer an opportunity for families to work together in the outdoors, meet local farmers, and gain a better understanding of where food comes from,” explains Hoisington. To learn about opportunities to volunteer for Salem Harvest, visit the organization’s website at www.salemharvest.org.

“Fighting Pretty” Care Packages Bring Encouragement to Women with Cancer

“Fighting Pretty” Care Packages Bring Encouragement to Women with Cancer

There is no doubt, facing a cancer diagnosis is extremely difficult and comes with many insecurities. Fighting Pretty, centered in Portland, aims to help women facing any cancer diagnosis to feel empowered and has sent over 4,500 packages nationally and internationally.

Kara Skaflestad, the founder of the non-profit, was inspired to create the organization after fighting her own battle with breast cancer, which resulted in a double mastectomy, chemotherapy, radiation, fertility treatments, and hormone therapy.

In the midst of her fight, someone gave her pink boxing gloves, and the unique gift eventually became Kara’s symbol to never give up. In an interview with Koin 6 News, she said “It was really my symbol to keep fighting and to never give up.”

After completing her treatment, she gave the pink boxing gloves along with some makeup to a friend who was also diagnosed with breast cancer; with this gift, the idea for Fighting Pretty began to form.

“It was kind of the first pretty package that I ever sent. Then she went on to pass on her boxing gloves, and they went on to five people.” Kara said.

The packages now include a bright pink box, items to motivate the receiver, including a pair of mini pink boxing gloves, and beauty products such as scarves and makeup. Each box has the greeting, “Hello Beautiful!”

“Fighting Pretty really encourages and empowers women to remember how strong and beautiful and amazing they are. Whether they have hair or no hair, breasts or no breasts, they are still an incredible, amazing woman.”

Reflecting on her own experience, Kayla hopes that Fighting Pretty will remind cancer fighters and survivors that they are still special, beautiful, and loved, even if they lose their hair or breasts.

“I lost my hair, my eye lashes, and had a double mastectomy. I lost my breasts. That was really hard. I mean, at first looking at myself in the mirror coming out of the shower, it was shocking.”

The boxes are funded through $30 donations to the non-profit and are usually sent by someone the cancer fighter knows and loves.

Local Boy Signs with Portland Timbers

Local Boy Signs with Portland Timbers

Earlier this month, the Portland Timbers added an exceptional new player to their roster. Five-year-old Derrick Tellez of Portland may be a few feet shorter than his teammates, but Timbers coach Caleb Porter can attest to his skills on the field: “Derrick is an extremely talented young goalkeeper, and we’re excited to have him signed for this weekend’s game against Orlando City,” Porter said.

Derrick, who is battling brain cancer, received his special contract with the Timbers through the Make-A-Wish Foundation. The budding soccer star couldn’t imagine anything more exciting than playing with the Timbers. Gavin Wilkinson, president of soccer for the Timbers, also feels enthusiastic about the team’s new arrangement: “We are thrilled to welcome Derrick to the club and help make his wish to sign with the Portland Timbers a reality for him and his family,” Wilkinson stated.

Derrick was scheduled to enjoy an exclusive training session with Timbers players, and to join the team in Orlando City for pregame warm-ups and the National Anthem. The Timbers planned to present him with a customized locker and personalized green jersey. Porter was eager to see his newly-minted player participate in team activities: “We are pleased to have him join our club and look forward to his contributions.”

Hillsboro Classroom Transformed into Hogwarts

Hillsboro Classroom Transformed into Hogwarts

Kyle Hubler, a Hillsboro teacher at Evergreen Middle School, worked this summer to redesign his entire classroom into Hogwarts, the magical, castle-like school in Harry Potter.

The classroom has everything imaginable: feathered pens, brick wallpaper, a chess set, stone owls, cauldrons, and even keys hanging from the ceiling.

In an interview with Koin6, he said, “I’ve been collecting this stuff since I was in middle school. Most of it came from my garage.”

He hopes that by decorating the classroom like the general setting of the favorite children’s novel, he will keep the students’ attention as well as show them that he cares about them. “Once they understand that I care about them, then they can actually start to care about what I’m going to teach them”, Huber stated. “That’s really fulfilling to me.”

View the full interview with Kyle Hubler below: