Portland Timbers helped young Oregonian celebrate recovery from cancer

Portland Timbers helped young Oregonian celebrate recovery from cancer

Five years ago, Atticus Lane-Dupre led his soccer team to a 10-9 defeat of the Portland Timbers at Jeld-Wen Field. Many professional players would consider winning against the Timbers, who took home the 2015 MLS Cup title, a significant achievement.

Lane-Dupre, however, wasn’t a pro soccer star at the time of his victory. He wasn’t even eligible for a driver’s license. In fact, he was only eight years old–albeit an eight-year-old with exceptional bravery and talent.

In late 2011, doctors diagnosed Lane-Dupre with kidney cancer. During treatment, he wished that his youth soccer team, the Green Machine, could play a game against the Timbers. Lane-Dupre’s dream became a reality thanks to Make-A-Wish Oregon, who partnered with the Timbers to arrange a match.

For Lane-Dupre, the game wasn’t a farewell to soccer, but rather a celebration of his recovery. On game day, May 1, 2013, his doctors had declared Lane-Dupre to be in remission after rounds of surgery and chemotherapy.

“The game occurred just when he was really getting better,” explained Bert Dupre, Lane-Dupre’s father. “So, that was an awesome celebration. He was done with chemo, he was feeling better and the whole city celebrated with us.”

3,000 fans showed up to cheer Lane-Dupre at Jeld-Wen Stadium as his team walked shoulder-to-shoulder with the Timbers onto the field. Lane-Dupre ultimately contributed four goals to the Green Machine’s effort, including the tiebreaker at the end of the match.

Now a 13-year-old middle school student at Mt. Tabor, Lane-Dupre still cherishes memories from his experience with the Timbers. “I remember the morning,” Lane-Dupre told The Oregonian. “All my friends, we were out on the blacktop before school and then the limo pulled up and we all just ran over and were really excited. The rest of the day is kind of a blur.”

The Timbers have continued to remain in contact with Lane-Dupre. In 2015, the club paid for Lane-Dupre and his family to attend the MLS Cup title match in Columbus, Ohio. The Timbers won the game to claim their first MLS Cup title. “That was really fun,” Lane-Dupre recalls. “We got to stay at the same hotel as the players. . . . I would go down and get hot chocolate and I would say hi to the players.”

“We just feel so embraced by the Timbers and the Timbers Army,” added Jennifer Lane, Lane-Dupre’s mom.

Young Oregonians Receive National Recognition for Community Service

Young Oregonians Receive National Recognition for Community Service

Comparatively few teenagers have the vision to establish a nonprofit organization. Few others have the logistical know-how to coordinate a public event with local businesses and news media.

But 16-year-old Malcolm Asher and 14-year-old Irie Page, both of Portland, Oregon, are not average teenagers. Last Sunday, the pair received national honors in Washington, D.C., for exceptional service to their communities. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program, established by Prudential Financial and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), judged Malcolm and Irie to be Oregon’s most committed high school and middle school volunteers.

The teens enjoyed a dinner reception at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and accepted $1,000 awards from Olympic medalist Lindsey Vonn, who commended them for their service.

Both young adults earned their accolades for demonstrating “leadership and determination well beyond their years,” according to John Strangfeld, CEO of Prudential Financial. “[It’s] a privilege to celebrate their service,” he said.

Malcolm, a junior at Cleveland High School, established a not-for-profit foundation which helps hospitalized children all over the world create and share artwork with their peers. Malcolm volunteered at a children’s hospital in Portland and witnessed how drawing and painting helped young patients overcome the anxiety associated with a hospital stay. “I could plainly see what a lift this provided to kids who were feeling anxious and scared,” he told KATU news.

This experience motivated Malcolm to found ArtPass, which distributes art kits to hospitalized youth. The organization operates in 11 countries worldwide and encourages young people in developing nations to seek medical care, rather than delay treatment due to anxiety about a hospital stay.

Meanwhile, Irie hosted a nationally recognized author and educator at a free public event designed to inform teens about safe dating practices. Irie raised funds for the author’s speaking fee by establishing a GoFundMe account and securing sponsorships from local businesses. Portland State University provided a recital hall for the event, and local news media publicized the occasion.

As a result of Irie’s efforts, about 500 teens and their parents came to the program, prompting the author to waive his speaking fee. Irie subsequently offered the funds to local organizations which strive to eliminate sexual violence.

In summing up the awards ceremony at the Smithsonian, NASSP president Daniel P. Kelley told attendees that teens like Malcolm and Irie show that “one student really can make a difference. We are honored to shine a spotlight on the compassion, drive, and ingenuity of each of these young volunteers.”

More information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, along with a list of honorees for 2018, can be found at http://spirit.prudential.com and www.nassp.org/spirit.

Portland Christian School Emphasis on Community Makes All the Difference

Portland Christian School Emphasis on Community Makes All the Difference

When it comes to your children’s education, finding the right school can be a huge challenge. According to Keegan family, from Portland, when they were on the hunt to find the best education for their children, Portland Christian Schools (PCS) met all their expectations and that has made all the difference to them as parents.

“Choosing a school was a really big decision for us,” says Tammy Keegan, mother of PCS students. “We wanted a faith-based school where our kids could stay from start to finish — kindergarten through graduation — that’s small enough to provide a family-feel but big enough to offer many options.”

The family-feel, Tammy Keegan is talking about, can be contributed to PCS commitment to the community. The community atmosphere the school is known for and strives after begins with a lower student to teacher ratio than other schools. The average class size is 13 students for every one teacher.

Yet, lower student to teacher ratio is not the only way PCS is excelling at their commitment to the community. Students at the elementary school participate in a peer ministry program. The program teaches third graders how to develop skills to support each other. Junior and Senior high students develop leader plans and then, in turn, lead their fellow students in a robust conversation about important topics.

The high emphasis PCS puts on community involves getting to know the parents needs in addition to the students. “Everyone at Portland Christian supports each other,” says PCS parent of three. “When someone is having a tough time, the administration, the teachers, and other parents all rally around and step up to make a difference.”

If you are looking for a school for your children and interested in learning more about PCS, you can go to their website by clicking here.

Oregon’s Population is on the Rise

Oregon’s Population is on the Rise

According to Koin6, it has been estimated that Oregon’s population is now at 4.1 million, according to an annual report from Portland State University’s Population Research Center. The research report stated that the population increased by almost 65,00 residents since 2016. The biggest factor was people migrating to the state, accounting for 88% of the increase. The other 12% was attributed to an increase in the amount of births in the state over deaths.

The tri-county Portland metropolitan areas unsurprisingly reported the largest population gains since last year. Multnomah and Washington Counties also added over 12,000 residents while Clackamas County added a little over 8,000 residents. The City of Portland saw the greatest growth over any other city in Oregon; it’s population now estimated at 639,100.

Finally, Deschutes County, located in Central Oregon, saw in increase of 3.6%, which was the greatest increase by percentages, adding around 3,265 new citizens to its most popular city, Bend.

 

Private Group Helps Preserve Pacific Crest Trail

Private Group Helps Preserve Pacific Crest Trail

Over 400 acres of land in the Stevens Pass area were purchased by a local group so as to prevent the Pacific Crest Trail from being severed. The Pacific Crest Trail Association is a private group focused on protecting and promoting the Pacific Crest National Trail, which runs from Mexico to Canada including the famous Cascades in Washington. It’s a popular site to Pacific North-westerners and tourists alike.

In an interview with Megan Wargo, the PCTA’s director of land protection, she stated that “the Forest Service is the overall manager for the entire trail. Where the trail goes through private land, they have a trail easement to allow the public to pass through the private property.”

However, on part of the Stevens Pass, no one had obtained an easement. Wargo believes this mistake was an oversight since the path was built piece by piece. “In most likelihood, it was just an oversight. Somebody thought there was an easement there, but the easement was not recorded.”

The association managed to secure federal money with the help of the Forest Service from the Land and Water Conservation Fund to purchase the land; however, the PCTA had to secure a loan from The Conservation Fund to help with the purchase because of the magnitude of the forest fires this summer.

Once the Forest Service can turn its focus away from the forest fires, the PCTA will sell the land to the Forest Service and repay the loan.

“It was a roller-caster ride getting it closed,” Wargo stated. “The risk of not closing that project would have been pretty large as far as the PCT and keeping it open.”

 

 

OMSI Shares Ingenious Gingerbread Houses

OMSI Shares Ingenious Gingerbread Houses

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry is a key landmark in Portland, Oregon and an exciting opportunity for people of all ages. This winter is no different as OMSI opens up an exhibit specifically to celebrate the Holiday Season.

Portland architects and bakers coordinated to produce the event. It will be part of OMSI’s latest exhibit, entitled “Illusion: Nothing Is As It Seems”. It just recently opened and will run through January 1st.

According to an article in The Oregonian, all of the gingerbread houses are made up of 80% edible material and have a wide variety of themes, which include merry-go-rounds, skyscrapers, and landscapes.

View more photos of the exhibit on The Oregonian and visit the actual exhibit this winter!