President Trump issues new HHS Title X family planning program rule

President Trump issues new HHS Title X family planning program rule

President Trump is considering a series of actions that would significantly cripple Planned Parenthood, following through his commitment to protecting the unborn. While the President had stated his interest in aiding the Pro-Life movement at events such as the Washington, D.C. March for Life, he did not mention specific strategies for accomplishing his goal. This time, the President has a plan.

Title X, also known as the “Family Planning Program,” provides families, especially those of low-income background, with health services and resources. While abortion does not fall under the programs that Title X supports, Planned Parenthood still receives over $50 million a year from it, according to LifeSitenews. This is because the organization is listed as a family and health program, and claims to use the money for non-abortion services. Under President Ronald Reagan, Title X was barred from groups that promoted abortions. However, the Clinton administration eagerly overturned Reagan’s mandate. Thus, President Trump seeks to return to the Reagan-era restrictions.

Specifically, the President seeks to focus on the separation of Title X funds from practices that harm the unborn. Since the Clinton administration, Pro-Choice groups have not been not required to strictly report their spending of government money, which has enabled Planned Parenthood and its associates to funnel federal money to its abortion clinics. According to the National Review, under Trump’s restrictions, Planned Parenthood would be forced to financially separate its Title X operations from any activities involving abortions. However, since Planned Parenthood’s abortion services are integral to its finances, some analysts claim that it would be impossible, or at least extremely difficult, to meet this separation. If Planned Parenthood refuses to comply, it will be denied its funding from Title X.

Critics claim that this decision will severely inhibit access to women’s health care, as Planned Parenthood provides services that lie outside the boundaries of abortions. However, the Trump administration stated that “non-abortion” health centers greatly outnumber their counterparts at Planned Parenthood by more than 20 to 1, assuring families that they will still have ample access to a wide array of providers. Additionally, many opponents of Planned Parenthood believe that the group’s alleged allocation of Title X funds to abortions are a misuse of tax dollars that are meant to be spent on tackling illnesses and health issues.

The Trump administration has not spared words when opposing the misdeeds and moral crimes of Planned Parenthood and similar organizations. Now it seems that the President is closer to taking action against such groups, though it is also up to voters to support and pressure the White House to follow through with its words.

A Unique Take on Mother’s Day: A Doctor’s Perspective

A Unique Take on Mother’s Day: A Doctor’s Perspective

The day before Mother’s Day, The Oregonian posted, unsurprisingly, an article on motherhood. What was surprising was it’s discussion of death in relation to mothers and their children with Tarvez Tucker, a doctor in the neuroscience intensive care unit at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon.

The article began with a candid statement by the journalist, Tom Hallman Jr: “If we’re honest, many children see Mother’s Day as an obligation. Rarely do we reflect on what a mother’s love means. Nor do we acknowledge the truth that in time it will be just another Sunday in May.”

This reflection was prompted by Dr. Tucker’s writings on the deaths of some mothers she has seen in the ICU. One story describes a mother fatally shot on a stormy night, asking the nurse to take care of her four-year old son who was afraid of thunderstorms. Another describes a mother with cancer refusing exhaustive, experimental treatment that would only give her two more months to go home to dye eggs with her five young children.

Hallman states that Tucker’s reflections resulted in her belief that “the most profound expressions of love are the ones between mother and child. Hallman notes that this love is not greater than that of the father’s, but it is different since the mother carries the baby within herself, resulting in a unique intimacy that is at the root of motherhood. The moment the child is born, the mother must introduce her child into the world, “and so begins a lifetime of letting go” that ends with the hope that the mother can die with her children by her side, able to continue her work of carrying the world forward.

He ended the article by including Dr. Tucker’s thoughts on her own gift of motherhood to her four sons, stating that her sons “think she’s too sentimental, calling her mushy when she tries to explain the depth of love for the babies who grew into the men who one day will be by her beside when her time comes.” But she does want to leave them a message on her deathbed since “in those last moments, I hear how people love each other.”

Read more of Dr. Tucker’s stories in the original article on The Oregonian.

Portland Timbers helped young Oregonian celebrate recovery from cancer

Portland Timbers helped young Oregonian celebrate recovery from cancer

Five years ago, Atticus Lane-Dupre led his soccer team to a 10-9 defeat of the Portland Timbers at Jeld-Wen Field. Many professional players would consider winning against the Timbers, who took home the 2015 MLS Cup title, a significant achievement.

Lane-Dupre, however, wasn’t a pro soccer star at the time of his victory. He wasn’t even eligible for a driver’s license. In fact, he was only eight years old–albeit an eight-year-old with exceptional bravery and talent.

In late 2011, doctors diagnosed Lane-Dupre with kidney cancer. During treatment, he wished that his youth soccer team, the Green Machine, could play a game against the Timbers. Lane-Dupre’s dream became a reality thanks to Make-A-Wish Oregon, who partnered with the Timbers to arrange a match.

For Lane-Dupre, the game wasn’t a farewell to soccer, but rather a celebration of his recovery. On game day, May 1, 2013, his doctors had declared Lane-Dupre to be in remission after rounds of surgery and chemotherapy.

“The game occurred just when he was really getting better,” explained Bert Dupre, Lane-Dupre’s father. “So, that was an awesome celebration. He was done with chemo, he was feeling better and the whole city celebrated with us.”

3,000 fans showed up to cheer Lane-Dupre at Jeld-Wen Stadium as his team walked shoulder-to-shoulder with the Timbers onto the field. Lane-Dupre ultimately contributed four goals to the Green Machine’s effort, including the tiebreaker at the end of the match.

Now a 13-year-old middle school student at Mt. Tabor, Lane-Dupre still cherishes memories from his experience with the Timbers. “I remember the morning,” Lane-Dupre told The Oregonian. “All my friends, we were out on the blacktop before school and then the limo pulled up and we all just ran over and were really excited. The rest of the day is kind of a blur.”

The Timbers have continued to remain in contact with Lane-Dupre. In 2015, the club paid for Lane-Dupre and his family to attend the MLS Cup title match in Columbus, Ohio. The Timbers won the game to claim their first MLS Cup title. “That was really fun,” Lane-Dupre recalls. “We got to stay at the same hotel as the players. . . . I would go down and get hot chocolate and I would say hi to the players.”

“We just feel so embraced by the Timbers and the Timbers Army,” added Jennifer Lane, Lane-Dupre’s mom.

Iowa Legislature Approves Pro-Life Measure

Iowa Legislature Approves Pro-Life Measure

Thanks to middle-of-the-night efforts by Iowa legislators, unborn children in the state may soon receive significant new protections against elective abortions. Earlier this month, the Iowa House and Senate approved a measure to ban almost all abortions when the fetus presents a detectable heartbeat, usually six weeks after conception. Exceptions to the bill concern certain cases of rape or incest.

According to KATU news, the measure passed the Iowa House by a slim 51-46 margin, after nine hours of debate. The restrictive nature of the bill, which includes some of the most stringent protections against abortion in the United States, provoked intense criticism from Iowa Democrats.

“These restrictions do nothing to reduce or eliminate abortion but put roadblocks between a woman and her physician in making the best medical decision for her,” stated Rep. Beth Wessel-Kroeschell (D-Ames). Meanwhile, Rep. Shannon Lundgren (R-Peosta) argued that the bill contains valuable protections for the unborn. “Today we are taking a courageous step . . . to tell the nation that Iowa will defend its most vulnerable, those without a voice, our unborn children,” Lundgren said.

Some Republican officeholders see the measure as a blatant challenge to the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. “I don’t think we’re even trying to disguise that,” Sen. Rick Bertrand (R-Sioux City) explained. “Today we will begin this journey as Iowa becomes . . . the starting line back to the Supreme Court.”

Legal battles over Iowa’s new legislation appear inevitable. The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which exercises jurisdiction over Iowa, previously rejected a North Dakota statute with similarities to Iowa’s new law.

Pro-abortion advocates argue that such legal disputes will squander taxpayer dollars. Pro-life legislators, meanwhile, hope for a chance to overturn Roe v. Wade. 

Young Oregonians Receive National Recognition for Community Service

Young Oregonians Receive National Recognition for Community Service

Comparatively few teenagers have the vision to establish a nonprofit organization. Few others have the logistical know-how to coordinate a public event with local businesses and news media.

But 16-year-old Malcolm Asher and 14-year-old Irie Page, both of Portland, Oregon, are not average teenagers. Last Sunday, the pair received national honors in Washington, D.C., for exceptional service to their communities. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program, established by Prudential Financial and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), judged Malcolm and Irie to be Oregon’s most committed high school and middle school volunteers.

The teens enjoyed a dinner reception at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and accepted $1,000 awards from Olympic medalist Lindsey Vonn, who commended them for their service.

Both young adults earned their accolades for demonstrating “leadership and determination well beyond their years,” according to John Strangfeld, CEO of Prudential Financial. “[It’s] a privilege to celebrate their service,” he said.

Malcolm, a junior at Cleveland High School, established a not-for-profit foundation which helps hospitalized children all over the world create and share artwork with their peers. Malcolm volunteered at a children’s hospital in Portland and witnessed how drawing and painting helped young patients overcome the anxiety associated with a hospital stay. “I could plainly see what a lift this provided to kids who were feeling anxious and scared,” he told KATU news.

This experience motivated Malcolm to found ArtPass, which distributes art kits to hospitalized youth. The organization operates in 11 countries worldwide and encourages young people in developing nations to seek medical care, rather than delay treatment due to anxiety about a hospital stay.

Meanwhile, Irie hosted a nationally recognized author and educator at a free public event designed to inform teens about safe dating practices. Irie raised funds for the author’s speaking fee by establishing a GoFundMe account and securing sponsorships from local businesses. Portland State University provided a recital hall for the event, and local news media publicized the occasion.

As a result of Irie’s efforts, about 500 teens and their parents came to the program, prompting the author to waive his speaking fee. Irie subsequently offered the funds to local organizations which strive to eliminate sexual violence.

In summing up the awards ceremony at the Smithsonian, NASSP president Daniel P. Kelley told attendees that teens like Malcolm and Irie show that “one student really can make a difference. We are honored to shine a spotlight on the compassion, drive, and ingenuity of each of these young volunteers.”

More information about The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards, along with a list of honorees for 2018, can be found at http://spirit.prudential.com and www.nassp.org/spirit.

Portland Christian School Emphasis on Community Makes All the Difference

Portland Christian School Emphasis on Community Makes All the Difference

When it comes to your children’s education, finding the right school can be a huge challenge. According to Keegan family, from Portland, when they were on the hunt to find the best education for their children, Portland Christian Schools (PCS) met all their expectations and that has made all the difference to them as parents.

“Choosing a school was a really big decision for us,” says Tammy Keegan, mother of PCS students. “We wanted a faith-based school where our kids could stay from start to finish — kindergarten through graduation — that’s small enough to provide a family-feel but big enough to offer many options.”

The family-feel, Tammy Keegan is talking about, can be contributed to PCS commitment to the community. The community atmosphere the school is known for and strives after begins with a lower student to teacher ratio than other schools. The average class size is 13 students for every one teacher.

Yet, lower student to teacher ratio is not the only way PCS is excelling at their commitment to the community. Students at the elementary school participate in a peer ministry program. The program teaches third graders how to develop skills to support each other. Junior and Senior high students develop leader plans and then, in turn, lead their fellow students in a robust conversation about important topics.

The high emphasis PCS puts on community involves getting to know the parents needs in addition to the students. “Everyone at Portland Christian supports each other,” says PCS parent of three. “When someone is having a tough time, the administration, the teachers, and other parents all rally around and step up to make a difference.”

If you are looking for a school for your children and interested in learning more about PCS, you can go to their website by clicking here.