Salem Harvest, a local non-profit, has a plan to reduce food waste and help the hungry. The organization “connects farmers and backyard growers with volunteer pickers” who gather produce which would otherwise go unused, writes Tom Hoisington of Salem Weekly. Salem Harvest then distributes the food free of charge to low-income families, the unemployed, the elderly, and other needy individuals.

According to Hoisington, the organization has collected over one million pounds of fruits and vegetables for the Marion-Polk Food Share and other local food banks since 2010, and boasts 2,600 volunteers. Thus, Salem Harvest is well-equipped to meet Oregon’s exceptional needs: more children, as a percentage of the population, experience hunger here than in any other state.

Salem Harvest benefits not only those who receive produce, but also those who give their time to harvest it. “Harvests offer an opportunity for families to work together in the outdoors, meet local farmers, and gain a better understanding of where food comes from,” explains Hoisington. To learn about opportunities to volunteer for Salem Harvest, visit the organization’s website at www.salemharvest.org.

Nicholas Comerchero is a junior at Corban University, where he plans to complete his undergraduate degree in political science. Nicholas enjoys thinking, writing, and speaking about public policy and economics.