SALEM, Ore.–

According to the Guttmacher Institute, current percentages indicate one in three American women will have had an abortion by the time she reaches age 45. For pro-life students of Corban University, the numbers are too high.

Their desire to spread hope led them to stand outside Planned Parenthood on Feb. 13 handing out roses to those who were going inside. The group has been going to Planned Parenthood every Friday since the fall of 2013 and plans on continuing because they might be able to encourage someone to reconsider having an abortion away from having an abortion.

While the Corban club is outside Planned Parenthood every Friday, they were joined on this Friday by students from OSU, Linn-Benton Community College and Western Oregon to hand out roses.

Tammy Haywood, a pro-life activist, occasionally joins the students, as well.

“We want to offer them hope,” she said. Haywood carries pamphlets in an apron she wears. Since Haywood’s mother had six abortions, she witnessed the struggle her mother experienced after each one. “I know the baggage they carry,” she said.

 

The group tries to have conversations with those passing by or going into the building.

“It draws attention to an issue,” Gabriella Henry, Corban student, said. “I feel a lot of people try to avoid the subject.”

On this particular Friday before Valentine’s Day, the group held up signs that read “Life,” “There is hope” and “There is another choice,” while giving out roses and chocolates to those they met.

“Even if we don’t talk to the people inside Planned Parenthood, the people driving by and the community see we love people,” Bethany Janzen, president of the Students For Life club at Corban, said. “We know that we’re making an impact. Even if we don’t really know what it is and we may never see it – we are making an impact.”

Katrina Aman is an aspiring journalist who desires to be a person of positive influence. Particularly passionate about poverty alleviation and civil rights, she hopes her writing takes her where she can improve lives.