Brittany Maynard and husband Dan DiazPORTLAND, Ore.–

Brittany Maynard’s choice to relocate to Portland to end her own life through Oregon’s Death With Dignity Act catapulted the 29-year-old to the forefront of the end-of-life rights debate. After advocating for end-of-life rights through organizations like Compassion & Choices, Maynard ended her life by medicated suicide in November.

Oregon is currently one of only five states allowing euthanasia in certain circumstances. Suffering from terminal brain cancer, Maynard chose to die following a seizure – an occurrence growing increasingly common during the final days of her life.

Beside Brittany throughout her trials and final choice was her husband of two years, Dan Diaz. This week, Diaz opened up about his experiences with Maynard in her final days and the pain he still feels from her loss.

“I have good days and bad days,” Diaz told People Magazine. “But the feeling of loss is always there – particularly in the morning when I first wake up. And at night, when the house is quiet and I’m just there with the dogs. I think about her every day.”

Diaz recalled Maynard’s final day in an interview with “The Meredith Vieira Show.”

“The seizure that morning was a reminder of what she was risking because what was coming next was losing her eyesight, becoming paralyzed and an inability to speak,” Diaz said. “And then she would essentially be trapped in her own body.”

After a walk with her husband and dog, Maynard took the suicidal medication in the presence of her family members on Nov. 1.

Brittany Maynard terminally ill at 29“It truly was the most peaceful experience that you could ever hope for when you talk about a person’s passing,” Diaz said. “I carry [her driver license] with me and any time I open my wallet I see her smiling face.”

Maynard’s decision remains rooted in controversy. Her YouTube video pronouncing her decision to end her life garnered over 11 million views, advocating for the right of assisted suicide.

Diaz continues to advocate for Death With Dignity legislation, and remains proud of his wife’s courage. While expressing how deeply he misses her, Diaz recognized that it would be selfish for him to want her to stay and prolong her own suffering.

“She was surrounded by the people she loved, and her passing was peaceful,” Diaz said.

When not writing, Sierra can be found conducting experiments in the chemistry lab or whipping up delectable creations in her kitchen. With a passion for storytelling, Sierra puts her natural curiosity to use investigating enlightening angles for news and events here at The Oregon Optimist.