2nd Grader wins a $30,000 scholarship

2nd Grader wins a $30,000 scholarship

2nd grader Sarah Gomez-Lane dreams of becoming a paleontologist. Recently she won a $30,000 scholarship for a simple dinosaur doodle this week.

Gomez-Lane is the winner of the 2018 Doodle for Google contest. This is the 10th annual contest and this year the tech company asked young artists to create drawings about their life’s aspirations.

After Google achieved hundreds upon thousands of submissions, Gomez-Lane won the $30,000 prize after drawing a group of dinosaurs in the shape of the Google logo.

Gomez-Lane told Google she drew dinosaurs because she wants to become a paleontologist when she grows up.

“When they called my name I felt happy and suprised, she said. “I’m going to call my principal and he’s going to say, ‘Yay!” Gomez-Lane told CBS News.

After Gomez-Lane was deemed winner, the company’s “Doodle team” collaborated with her to regenerate her drawing into an animated, interactive Google Doodle.

“I just hope when people see the doodle they are also inspired to think about not only what they dreamed of and wished of when they were kids, but to also take a second to enjoy the simple things in life,” Perla Campos, Global Marketing Lead of the Google Doodle Team, said in a video.”

86-year-old man bought 14 years of Christmas presents for his two-year-old neighbor

86-year-old man bought 14 years of Christmas presents for his two-year-old neighbor

Christmas kindness and bliss immersed from 86-year-old Ken Watson. Watson bought 14 years worth of Christmas presents for his two-year-old neighbor Cadi Williams.

Watson connected with the Williams family after they moved into their first home three years ago. The Williams’ and Watson formed an instant friendship and continued to foster close relationships after Cadi came into the world.

After Watson’s recent passing, the family was left heartbroken. Then suddenly, their melancholy dissipated when 14 Christmas presents were delivered by Mr.Watson’s daughter to their home in Barry, Wales.

“He’d always told us he’d live till he was 100-years-old,” Owen Williams wrote on Twitter after the presents were delivered. “So these gifts would have taken him up to our little girl’s 16th Christmas.”

“I kept reaching into the bag and pulling out more presents,” Williams told The Washington Post. “It was quite something.”

After the presents were delivered, the Williams thought of beginning a new Christmas tradition called, “A present from Ken,” but they could not decide which presents to unwrap first in order to figure out each age-appropriate gift.

A Twitter poll helped the Williams decide on what to do with each gift. 69% of Williams’s followers believed he should leave the presents unwrapped and let Cadi decide which gift would be unwrapped.

“Message received loud and clear, Twitter!” wrote the excited father. “We’re definitely going to open one every year till 2032… It’ll be our way of remembering an immensely generous gentleman — our new Christmas tradition.”

Williams assured his new followers of regular updates on the unraveling of gifts.

Numerous followers praised the compassionate gesture, with one writing: “What a thoughtful man who clearly thought so much of you all as a family, made me cry this morning.”

“You have to give her one a year,” another wrote on Twitter. “It doesn’t matter in the slightest if they are too old or too young. Presents are all about the giving, not the receiving.”

Another wrote: “That is just the loveliest, most thoughtful thing to do. I would save them each year and remind her what a lovely man you lived next door to.”

Others deemed it a “truly beautiful gesture” and others said it was “the true meaning of Christmas.”

At the end of the decisions and gratitude Williams advised his Twitter followers to build and foster relationships with their neighbors.

“Give your neighbors a small gift, a token. Just say, ‘Hi.’ You can open a new world just like we did.”

 

Florida Man Saves his 93-year-old neighbor from home fire

Florida Man Saves his 93-year-old neighbor from home fire

Not not all heroes wear capes. One man wore a cast. 27-year-old Altavious Powell rescued his 93-year-old neighbor Maria Cabral by using a cast on his broken arm to shatter a window.

Each night Cabral lights a candle in the corner of her home, however, this past Monday the flame intensified and her home ablaze.

Powell, who lives across the street from Cabral, saw smoke and rushed to her home.

Cabral was still trapped inside when Powell arrived. Powell used his cast and a plastic chair to enter her home, WSVN reported.

“I said, ‘Maria, Maria, where you at?’ And she said, ‘I’m right here,’ Powell told WSVN. “She was right here standing on the wall, so I just grabbed her with one arm. She looked up at me and she just said, ‘Thank you.”

Powell and Cabral were both taken to Jackson Memorial Hospital’s Ryder Trauma Center for smoke inhabitation. Cabral is still recovering, but Powell was unharmed from the incident.

Cabral’s son told WSVN: “She wouldn’t have gotten out of the house alive if that man didn’t come here.”

After Powell heard many deemed him a hero, he simply said:

“I’m just glad I was able to do it and I got it over with, and everybody is safe now.”




88-year-old mother Finally Reunited with her long-lost daughter

88-year-old mother Finally Reunited with her long-lost daughter

88-year-old Genevieve Purinton thought she had no family left in the world until she reunited with her biological daughter on December 3.

Purinton resides in a retirement home in North Tampa. Her eight siblings died recently and had no other children after she gave birth at 18 in 1949 and was told the child had died.

Unbeknownst to Purinton, the child was born in Gary, Indiana, given up for adoption and raised in Southern California. It remains unclear as to why doctor’s misinformed Purinton about her daughter’s death.

“I asked to see the baby and they said she died, that’s all I remember,” Purinton told NBC.

Moultroup ended up adopted, but it took an unfortunate turn at the start. At five years, Moultroup’s adoptive father married an abusive step-mother.

For most of her youth, Moultroup hoped her biological mother would come to her rescue. “It’s been a lifetime of wanting this. I remember being five years old, wishing I could find my mother,” Moultroup, who now resides in Vermont, told Daily Mail.

“She would fantasize about her mother rescuing her since she was five years old. It’s truly her life-long dream,” Moultroup’s daughter Bonnie Chase, 50, added.

Moultroup was finally granted her life-long wish, when her daughter gave her an Ancestry DNA kit last Christmas.

“It was just a cool Christmas present and it has completely changed our lives,” Chase said.

The kit led Moultroup to call her cousin. “I said, “Here’s my mother’s given name,” Moultroup told WTNT. “She said, “That’s my aunt and she’s still alive.”

The mother and daughter reunited at the nursing facility earlier this week and cried joyous tears.

“We’re criers. We just cry a lot. There were a lot of tears and there’s been a lot of tears the entire time since then. It’s been really amazing,” Moultroup said.

“We’re thrilled that Ancestry was able to play a part in helping to connect Genevieve Purinton with her daughter after 69 years. We wish her and her family the best, and that this is the only beginning of an enduring relationship,” Jasmin Jimenez, a spokeswoman for Ancestry DNA told NBC.

Stuck in airport for 8 months, Syrian refugee is finally given a home

Stuck in airport for 8 months, Syrian refugee is finally given a home

A Syrian Refugee spent more than eight months living in the transit zone of a Malaysian airport.

37-year-old Hassan Al Kontar is one of many Syrians who fled the country after war in Syria broke out in 2011.

Previously Kontar worked as an insurance marketing manager in the United Arabs Empire from 2006 to 2012.

He left is home in Syria for UAE in 2006 in order to avoid being called into mandatory military service. The Syrian government later refused to renew his passport after war broke out.

“I’m not a killing machine and I don’t want any part in destroying Syria,” he told the BBC.

After his passport expired, Kontar’s work permit also became invalid.

After staying in the UAE, he was arrested and told to leave the country. He flew to Malaysia, one of the few countries where Syrians have a chance of obtaining a visa.

There he was granted a three month tourist visa and immediately began working to save up sums to fly to Ecuador, however; when he showed up for his flight to Ecuador in February, he was turned away at the gate for reasons that remain unclear.

Kontar flew to Cambodia instead, with the attempt to avoid deportation to Syria, but he arrived only to be sent back to the Kuala Lumpur International airport in Malaysia.

He arrived back in Malaysia, but could not enter the country because he outstayed his visa. At that point, Kontar had no other options than to live in the “arrivals” section until a country accepted him.

Kontar spent the next several months documenting his life over video and posting them to Twitter. Some videos consisted of himself tending to his potted plants, talking about his favorite books and films, crocheting stuffed animals, and him using the moving walkways as a treadmill.

He had no access to the outside world and longed for fresh air. Despite the grimness that came with living at the airport, he still was able to eat leftover chicken and rice dinners given by compassionate airline staff and able to shower in the public washrooms.

Among his fan base was a woman named Laurie Cooper from Whistler, British Columbia who came across Kantar’s videos and felt a strong inclination to help the man.

“It all seemed impossible: I’m just a woman who lives in a little log cabin and he was living in an airport,” Cooper told The Guardian.

Cooper, a volunteer for Canada Caring Society partnered with British Columbia Muslim Association to petition for Canada’s immigration minister to admit Kontar as a refugee.

Cooper and the two organizations managed to raise over $20,000 for his sponsorship and found him a full-time job at the city hotel.

Cooper and these Canadian organizations gathered their resources, but among the rallying came a roadblock. Malaysian authorities arrested Kantar for staying in a restricted area without a boarding pass and held him in a detention center and threatened him with deportation.

Panic reigned over Cooper, those working for the organizations, and Kontar.

Cooper and the other Canadians urged Canadian officials to speed up the resettlement process, fearing he would be deported back to Syria.

Miraculously, Kontar was released. He sent a text to Cooper saying he was on his way.

Before Kontar got on the plane to Vancover, he posted a video to Twitter during a layover in Tawian this past Monday. “I could not do it without the help of my family — my Canadian friends and family and my lawyer. Thank you all. I love you all,” he said.

Upon arrival Kontar hugged Cooper while trying to hold back his tears. “I just feel so grateful that things worked out and that he’s here and that he’s safe,” Cooper told reporters at the airport.

“I never doubted for a moment that we would get him here,” she added.

Kontar is now staying at Cooper’s house, enjoying his bed and warm clothes donated by community members. Overall, Cooper is thankful for his safety and glad the process came to an end.

“It was a unique and very difficult situation. We are really grateful to the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and citizenship and to the Canadian officals who worked so hard to resolve Hassan’s predicament,” she said in a public statement.

“We are proud that Canada was willing to step up and help Hassan when so many countries around the world are closing their doors to refugees.”