Pampers and Koala Kare to install 5,000 changing tables in men’s restrooms

Pampers and Koala Kare to install 5,000 changing tables in men’s restrooms

Pampers has decided to aide dads all over the U.S. who have found themselves unable to find a baby changing station in men’s restrooms.

Multiple dads have posted photos depicting their babies on the floor of men’s restrooms because there was no changing table. Several of the pictures have gone viral.

Pampers wants to create change. They have jump started the “Love the Change” campaign in collaboration with Koala Kare to provide 5,000 changing tables in public restrooms across the U.S. and Canada by 2021.

The changing tables will be placed in the restrooms where they are most needed, such as parks, recreation centers, community centers and libraries. Pampers said in a release that the tables will appear in cities such as Cincinnati, Dallas, Philadelphia and more.

Musician and singer John Legend has played a part in supporting this change. He has joined the combined efforts of many dads in sharing the unique ways they’ve had to find somewhere to change their child.

“I call this the piano solo,” Legend said as his baby was on a piano, as reported by ABC 7. Other dad’s created makeshift changing stations using the driver’s seat or the trunk.

The campaign was brought to light in part because of a Florida dad, Donte Palmer, who was at the center of the countless stories in 2018. One of his children took a photo of him squatting in a restaurant restroom in Jacksonville to change his child. The photo gathered support from folks from coast-to-coast, including celebrities such as Ashton Kutcher.

Kutcher initiated a Change.org petition a couple years ago to rally for changing tables in men’s bathrooms in retail stores.

“Fathers, we aren’t highlighted like we should be,” Palmer told WJXT at the time. “And I just want to bring that view and that light to us fathers, because we do matter and we do exist, and we are willing to do more than just provide and protect.”

Palmer and fathers in his same situation have begun a movement called Squat For Change.

Nine out of 10 dads have gone into a public restroom that had no changing table, according to Pampers.

Read the full story and watch videos on the subject here.

For more background and to see more photos related to this story, click here.

Donte Palmer

Donte Palmer changing his child.

 

Parkrose High School coach tackles armed student

Parkrose High School coach tackles armed student

A former wide receiver for the Oregon Ducks has been pronounced a hero after tackling a potential shooter at Parkrose High School on May 17.

Keanon Lowe, who works as a football and track coach as well as a security guard at the school, confronted and overcame a student who took a concealed rifle to class. Lowe tackled the student before he was able to point or fire the weapon.

“When I signed up to be a Security Guard, Football and Track & Field Coach for Parkrose High School, I did so to guide and coach young people whose shoes I had once been in. I had no idea, that I would one day have to put my life on the line like I did yesterday for my students,” Lowe tweeted on Saturday, as reported by The Washington Post.

“I didn’t see any other choice but to act,” Lowe said in a tweet. “I’ve spent the last 24 hours being more appreciative of my family and realizing we have a serious problem.”

“I’m blessed to be alive and extremely happy that the students are safe. I’m not sure what’s next, I haven’t had the time to really think about it,” Lowe said. “But I am sure I want to be a part of the solution to school gun violence.”

Parkrose students told school officials about the classmate who demonstrated troubling behavior in the days prior to the event. The student hinted that he wanted to hurt himself and obtain firearms, according to The Oregonian.

Lowe searched for the troubled student in his government class, but did not find him, according to other classmates. With ten minutes remaining in the class, police said 18-year-old Angel Granados Dias showed up in a long coat and revealed that he had a rifle. Students and teachers escaped the classroom through a back door.

“A Portland Police School Resource Officer and other officers arrived and immediately entered the school and found the staff member detaining the subject in the hallway,” police said in a statement.

Lowe thanked the Portland Police for their help.

Lowe is in his second year working at Parkrose High School. He formerly worked as an offensive analyst for the San Francisco 49ers and Philadelphia Eagles. He also coached at Jesuit high in Portland, his alma mater.

Attending University of Oregon from 2010 to 2014, Lowe was a three-year starter at wide receiver. He caught 68 passes for 891 yards and 11 touchdowns.

Proclaimed the “team’s most inspirational player” as a redshirt senior, Lowe earned a reputation as a fan favorite. The fans admired him because of his unselfish blocking habits and triumphant celebrations of teammates’ accomplishments.

Parkrose football players said that Lowe had already made a big impact on the school despite his brief time there, according to The Oregonian.

After students were reunited with their parents, Lowe told police that he was tired and that he wanted to see his own loved ones. As reported by The Oregonian, two men stopped to shake Lowe’s hand while they were in the parking lot. One woman hugged him and said, “Thank you.”

“I’m just happy everyone was okay,” he told reporters. “I’m happy I was able to be there for the kids and for the community.”

Read more about this story here.

To read several Tweets directed to Lowe, click here.

Known for their Jewelery, not for almost being aborted

Known for their Jewelery, not for almost being aborted

The Gannaway brothers, Tim and Jim, are known in Warrenton, OR for their jewelry. They are able to turn stones, opals, sapphires, and diamonds into masterpieces. Since 1973, the twins have owned Gannaway Brothers Jewelers. But what some do not know about the brothers is that they almost became abortion survivors.

They were born in April 1951 in a Catholic hospital in St. Paul Minnesota. Their mother Jan almost had an abortion, but soon decided against it. “I never went through with the abortion because I wanted babies,” she said. 

Afterwards, Tim and Jim were born prematurely, with Tim weighing two pounds and 14 ounces; Jim weighing three pounds. As a result the twins remained in incubators from April 30 – July 6. Jan finally picked them up when Jim made it to five pounds.

Growing up was hard for the brothers. As a result of their extended stay– the twins garnered poor eyesight, lung problems, and pneumonia. “I had to feed them 24 hours a day,” Jan said.

After high school, Tim still had trouble reading in school, only reading at a “sixth grade level with 20% comprehension,” he said. After 12 years in Catholic school, the brothers went their separate ways, before seeing each other after one year. Jim attended the University of Minnesota and Tim went to Bemidji State College.

In college, Tim majored in Chemistry “because it was easier than having to read” he said. After enrolling in a jewelry making course, he developed a passion for the craft. Jim also took on an interest, deciding to form a jewelry business with his brother. After the Capital Scare, they could not afford the expensive equipment. They had to solder, form, and bend every component of each piece of jewelry by hand.

Shortly after the 1973 oil embargo hit, they owed over $12,000 to suppliers and had no way to pay it back. Jim found a farming job in Wisconsin and Tim moved to Astoria, OR in response to an ad for a jeweler that his parents, Bob and Jan Gannaway, who was living in Portland, saw in The Oregonian. Jim and his family shortly followed. The brothers worked on shrimp boats to pay back the sums. By 1979 the debt was paid off and the jewelry store was making quite a bit of profit.

Today, Jim and Tim not only successfully run their jewelry store, but alongside their mother — continue to be advocates for pro life.

Jan believes in alternatives to abortion, while simultaneously being empathetic toward women contemplating abortion.

(To women thinking about abortion) “I would have to go with what I think and say you’re making a mistake,” Jan said. “You’re not looking at the whole picture. I understand these thoughts, ‘Now what am I going to do? What am I going to say? What am I gonna do with a baby?’ Yeah, all of that to me is solvable. It can be solved as time goes on. So, no it’s not necessary to ever abort.”

“With a woman, that’s your body and your body changes,” Jan said. “You are changing with it. And the horror of that could be beyond your wildest dream. You don’t even conceive that.”

Tim and Jim offered advice for spouses forcing their loved ones to get abortions.

“Who are we to decide what life is going to be for this child?” Tim asked. “I would also ask, ‘Would you be interested in considering another view?’ And if they said they would, I would explain to them the differences in human morality versus absolute morality. But if they said ‘no,’ there’s nothing to talk about. The best thing to do is try and understand the person you are talking to. If someone is open, show them what a child would look like in the physical world.”

“Life doesn’t come from a mother, it comes from God,” Jim said. “And the new life you created in your own image and likeness.”

 

Representative Rick Lewis Helps Oregonians Hear Again

Representative Rick Lewis Helps Oregonians Hear Again

Representative Rick Lewis, R-Silverton, has proposed legislation that will change the number of hearing aids Oregon Health Plan (OHP) grants.  Patients who were granted only one hearing aid, every five years, will now have the hope and ability to hear in both ears.

Hearing aids have been inaccessible to low-income patients outside of their Medicare plan, sometimes costing them thousands of dollars. Those with hearing issues find themselves left only able to partially improve their hearing.  Under the OHP plan, members were only granted one single hearing aid. Having only one hearing aid prevents the ability to hear from multiple directions.

“When people lose hearing in one ear, they typically lose it in both,” said Lewis. “If they have one hearing aid most sound comes from one direction.”

Because of Lewis’ prompting, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) began to review their budget and policies.  The agency discovered that the federal government permits states to make administrative changes to the OHP hearing aid grants. OHP also found that providing a full set of hearing aids would be reasonably because of advances in hearing aid technology.

“The fact that it doesn’t cost additional money to make this happen is really important.”, Rep. Lewis stated.

The proposed legislation will help countless children in Oregon as well as adults. Oregonians who can’t hear may finally hear in both ears for the first time all thanks to Rep. Lewis.

Unexpected Pair became Friends and Touched Thousands of Hearts

Unexpected Pair became Friends and Touched Thousands of Hearts

Sometimes strangers can become friends.

Last week, 28-year-old Eric Haralson went to McDonald’s in Noblesville, Indiana with the sole intention of eating breakfast alone. Little did he know that as soon as he sat down — he would obtain company.

A 70-year-old woman named Jan approached Haralson in the restaurant and asked to join him for breakfast.

Haralson responded with an enthusiastic yes.

“My reply was ‘of course’ because that’s just who I am,” Haralson told Today Food. “So she grabbed her food, I pushed her chair out for her and introduced myself.”

After she sat down, both of them spent the next 45 minutes engaging in conversations about life and appreciating each other’s company.

Haralson spoke of his girlfriend and son and Jan spoke of going to church each Sunday and of her artist days.

After breakfast and conversations, Haralson walked her to her car and exchanged phone numbers with the desire to have breakfast again.

Later, Haralson saw a picture of him and Jan on Facebook. A school teacher named Amanda Marquell Craft snapped a photo of their exchange and published it to social media — praising Haralson for his compassion. The photo has been shared thousands of times.

“Shout out to this guy! This elderly lady (seemed to be a little lonely) came up to him and asked if she could sit with him,” Craft wrote.

“My friends and I watched him introduce himself and shake her hand. They talked and laughed together like they were friends. They didn’t know each other and they couldn’t be more different. But today they shared a meal together and it touched our hearts.”

David Leigh, a friend of Jan’s, commented on Haralson’s FB page also expressing his adoration for Haralson’s kindness.

“I know you made Jan’s day that morning of meeting her and allowing her to sit at your table,” Leigh wrote. “I don’t know if you are religious, but she may have been your guardian angel making a visit with you to see if you loved your fellow man… that was a blessed thing you did and keep doing them. God loves you. You truly are a gentleman. My best to you and your future.”

Haralson was glad to have shared a meal with her and was happy to have inspired many people, but he is most glad to have a new friend.

Jan “just wanted some conversation,” according to Haralson, but now her request  has sparked interest in many people to lend a helping hand, be kind people, and share their own stories of sitting down with strangers.

He even expressed his admiration for her and exchanged her words of wisdom with Today Food. “She is a wonderful woman,” Haralson said. “She mentioned many times how we all should love one another. And how we should not judge anyone because you never know how their day is going and what they’ve been through.”

Since last Thursday, Haralson had left Jan a voicemail asking to have breakfast with her again and expressing their newfound fame. He still has yet to reconnect with her.

“I’ll keep trying,” he said. “I know if we had forever, she would have a story for me for everyday.”

 

 

Thousand Oaks shooting witness credits God for survival

Thousand Oaks shooting witness credits God for survival

As Brendan Kelly danced to upbeat music at the Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, California, he heard a familiar sound: pop-pop-pop-pop. Kelly remembered hearing the same noise–the distinctive rattle of gunfire–at a country music concert in Las Vegas last year, and immediately took action.

“As soon as I identified where the target was, or where the threat was, I grabbed at least two people around me and yanked them as hard as I could to the nearest exit,” Kelly told KABC news, a CNN affiliate. Kelly and several other patrons escaped through a rear exit and fled to safety.

At that point, Kelly called his relatives to inform them he had lived through a second shooting. The Marine Corp veteran attributed his survival to divine providence. “Only thing I can attribute it to is God, his protective hand over me that night on October 1 (last year in Las Vegas) and last night,” he said.

Kelly’s phone call was interrupted by continued gunfire from the bar. As patrons streamed out of the building, Kelly rushed to administer first aid to the wounded. He removed his belt to slow the bleeding from a friend’s arm. “I wanted to help as best I could,” Kelly explained. “If we could be the first level of first responders before they got there, then you do all you can do instead of standing around not doing much.”

In his conversation with KABC reporters, Kelly struggled to come to grips with the Borderline shooting, which occurred just a block from his house. “It’s too close to home,” he said. Borderline had served as a “safe space” for Kelly and other survivors of the Las Vegas massacre–but that very place fell victim to the violence Kelly and his friends sought to escape.

Kelly’s conclusion? Only God could provide ultimate safety from danger.