Chelsea Soccer Club is sending Racist Fans on Educational trips to Auschwitz

Chelsea Soccer Club is sending Racist Fans on Educational trips to Auschwitz

Prejudice is everywhere; even in sports. Fans have been attending soccer matches and spewing antisemitic behavior.

Now the Chelesea football club in England will be offering their fans an opportunity to overcome their prejudiced behavior.

Instead of having the club confiscate their season tickets for a period of three years, those who have exhibited racist behavior can either accept the three-year ban or participate in educational courses taught at Auschwitz.

Roman Abramovich, the part owner of the club, is the primary force behind this initiative. The Chelsea football club will cover the costs of the program since they are set on terminating racist behavior.

Abramovich, who is Jewish himself, has already organized two visits to Auschwitz as part of its efforts to combat antisemitism. Fans who choose the option of taking a course at Auschwitz will be invited on future trips.

“If you just ban people, you will never change their behavior,” said Cheslea chairman Bruce Buck, according to The Sun. “This policy gives them the chance to realize what they have done, to make them want to behave better.”

“In the past, we would take them from the crowd and ban them, for up to three years. “Now we say ‘You did something wrong. You have the option. We can ban, you or you can spend some time with our diversity officers, understanding what you did wrong.’”

“Following a proposal raised at our Fan’s Forum, the club is launching an education program for supporters banned for anti-semitic behavior, as well as helping them to understand the impact of their actions, with participation in the course potentially leading to a reduction in the length of their ban,” the club said in a statement.

The initiative has been looked favorably by the Community Security Trust (CST), a charity that protects Jews from anti-semitism.

Head of CST policy, Dave Rich, told Huffpost UK: “Giving people the opportunity to change their views and learn, and tackling anti-semitism through education is definitely something to be welcomed.

“If it works, then it’s much better than just banning somebody,” he continued. “If you ban someone from your football stadium they still have their racist views, it’s much better to change them.

“This sets an example of how to tackle anti-semitism, not just for football clubs, but others in society.”

The Say No Anti-Semitism initiative was also launched in March and a delegation from the club attended the March of the Living at Auschwitz.

Two months later, 150 Chelsea fans visited Auschwitz and two Holocaust survivors, Harry Spiro and Mala Tribich, spoke of their experiences.

“Hearing from a survivor, learning about the Holocaust, and understanding what language constitutes hate speech, all contribute to a better understanding and greater awareness of what anti-semitism is and how to combat it,” said Karen Pollock, Chief Executive of the Holocaust Educational Trust.

Through this initiative, the Chelesea football club is making a real commitment in fighting this issue within the games and the wider community,” she added.





Pro-life candidates promise greater protections for the unborn

Pro-life candidates promise greater protections for the unborn

While left-leaning media outlets warn of dire consequences for the pro-abortion cause should Brett Kavanaugh become the Supreme Court’s newest member, gubernatorial and Congressional candidates across the country promise to implement new protections for unborn children.

Minnesota gubernatorial candidate Jeff Johnson hopes to enact a “heartbeat bill” if he’s elected. The measure would follow Iowa’s blueprint by prohibiting doctors from aborting a fetus which has a measurable heartbeat. “[Iowa’s law] said if you can hear and feel a heartbeat, then that is a living child, and you shouldn’t be able to abort it,” Johnson told Minnesota Public Radio.

Meanwhile, Illinois Congressman Peter Roskam seeks to base his re-election bid on a strongly pro-life platform. In a televised debate with his Democratic opponent Sean Casten, Roksam stated that he is “not going to be defensive about being pro-life” and denounced Casten’s support for taxpayer-funded abortions.

When Casten attempted to characterize abortion as simply “a medical procedure like a gall bladder surgery,” Roskam pointed out the obvious: “Abortion is not gall bladder surgery.”

Finally, both Republican incumbent Mia Love and Democratic candidate Ben McAdams have touted their pro-life values in Utah’s most hotly contested congressional race. Love deemed herself “one of the main spokespersons here in Congress on the pro-life issue,” and highlighted her consistent pro-life track record. “[My] stance has always been the same. No abortions; to protect life at all stages of development, except in cases of rape, incest or life of a mother.”

For his part, McAdams stated he has “deeply held beliefs about the sanctity of life and what we can do to promote the sanctity of life. . . . I think abortion is far too common in America, and we should be taking steps to reduce abortion.”

Thus, fears regarding abortion access may dominate headlines–but pro-life voters should consider the positive implications of widespread state and federal support for abortion restrictions. Should pro-life campaign promises come to fruition, more unborn children will have a chance at life.

 

 

Abortion advocacy group targets pro-life Congressmen with multi-million dollar campaign

Abortion advocacy group targets pro-life Congressmen with multi-million dollar campaign

Republican Congressmen who have voted to restrict abortion may soon face new political challenges, according to The Washington Post. The National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL) plans to spend $5 million in 19 states to unseat pro-life legislators in the House of Representatives.

“This is the moment NARAL was made for,” said Ilyse Hogue, the organization’s president. “We’re seeing and feeling a deep anxiety that is ginning up the enthusiasm to take back the House as a buttress against Trump’s draconian agenda. It’s our job to translate it into wins.”

NARAL has never before launched such a large spending campaign, which will focus on vulnerable Republican districts in key battleground states, such as California, Michigan, and Virginia. Pro-abortion advocates hope the campaign will oust legislators who have sponsored “personhood” and “heartbeat” bills. Advocates of such measures, including Rep. Steve Knight (R-CA), Rep. Mike Bishop (R-MI), and Rep. Steve Chabot (R-Ohio), desire to undermine Roe v. Wade by dramatically restricting abortion after six weeks of pregnancy.

“Voters are shocked when they find out how these guys are voting,” Hogue stated. “When you tell them, at the very least it depresses their enthusiasm for supporting them. At best, it moves toward another candidate.”

NARAL has enjoyed significant increases in revenue following the 2016 presidential election. In the days following President Trump’s victory, the group’s weekly donor count increased by 4,000% relative to average. Such generous support has allowed the organization to expand its efforts to undermine the pro-life cause.

Oklahoma prepares to pass 72-hour abortion wait time bill

Oklahoma prepares to pass 72-hour abortion wait time bill

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla.—

On the heels of its groundbreaking legislation banning dismemberment abortions, Oklahoma is now set to pass a bill mandating a 72-hour waiting period for abortions.

The Oklahoma House voted 75-3 on Thursday to approve the bill, which now goes to Gov. Mary Fallin’s desk.

“In Oklahoma, we have a waiting period for divorce of 10 days. If there are minor children it is 90 days,” said Sen. Greg Treat. “We should also take it very seriously when we’re talking about the irrevocable decision of abortion.”

If the governor signs the bill, Oklahoma will become the fourth state with a 72-hour waiting period. The other states are Missouri, South Dakota and Utah.

Oregon currently has no waiting period or other restrictions on abortion: a woman can obtain an abortion at any time during pregnancy.

#IWishMyTeacherKnew campaign increases understanding of students’ lives

#IWishMyTeacherKnew campaign increases understanding of students’ lives

DENVER, Colo.—

Kyle Schwartz, a third grade teacher at Denver public school Doull Elementary, started a unique initiative to understand her students better, calling it a “reality check.” She had her students write something they wished she knew, and the results have gone viral.

The majority of the students at Doull are Hispanic, and 92 percent are eligible for free or reduced lunch programs. “As a new teacher, I struggled to understand the reality of my students’ lives and how to best support them,” Schwartz said. “I just felt like there was something I didn’t know about my students.”

Her idea became an activity she called “I Wish My Teacher Knew.” “I let students determine if they would like to answer anonymously,” she said. “I have found that most students are not only willing to include their name, but also enjoy sharing with the class. Even when what my students are sharing is sensitive in nature, most students want their classmates to know.”

She was blown away by the responses. “Some notes are heartbreaking like the first #iwishmyteacherknew tweet which read, ‘I wish my teacher knew I don’t have pencils at home to do my homework.’ I care deeply about each and every one of my students and I don’t want any of them to have to suffer the consequences of living in poverty, which is my main motivation for teaching.”

Among the things students wished she knew include:

“Sometimes my reading log isn’t signed because my mom isn’t around a lot.”

“I don’t have a friend to play with me.”

“How much I miss my dad since he got deported.”

“Vietnamese because then she can say words I forget.”

“She gives too much homework.”

“I love school.”

“I want to go to college.”

Schwartz’s idea began catching on with teachers around the world who want to connect with their students. “I think it caught on so fast because teachers are highly collaborative and freely share and explore resources,” she said. “In the end, all teachers want to support their students, and #iwishmyteacherknew is a simple and powerful way to do that.”

Many students shared their notes with the whole class, which helped to build community. “Building community in my classroom is a major goal of this lesson,” Schwartz said. “After one student shared that she had no one to play with at recess, the rest of the class chimed in and said, ‘we got your back.’ The next day during recess, I noticed she was playing with a group of girls. Not only can I support my students, but my students can support each other.”