In a major victory for the pro-life movement in Argentina, Pope Francis’ home country has refused to legalize elective abortion, reports CNN. The Argentine Senate voted down a bill which would have enabled women to abort their babies in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. The measure failed by a seven-vote margin, 38 to 31.

The public announcement of the vote sparked celebrations by pro-life demonstrators, who launched fireworks outside of Argentina’s National Congress building in Buenos Aires. Crowds of people donned blue, a color which symbolizes Argentina’s “save both lives” movement, and cheered when they heard the Senate’s official verdict.

In the aftermath of the announcement, some pro-abortion protesters clashed with police, who detained at least eight people. Demonstrators lobbed rocks and bottles at security forces, who attempted to quell the unrest with tear gas and water cannons.

The abortion bill had narrowly passed through Argentina’s lower house in June, and lawmakers expected the measure to face even greater opposition in the more conservative Senate. The weekend before the vote, a senator from Argentina’s opposition party withdrew her endorsement of the bill.

During the Senate debate, the Catholic Church conducted a “Mass for Life” in Buenos Aires, while pro-abortion demonstrators rallied in front of the Congress building.

Conservative lawmaker Marta Varela highlighted Argentina’s robust pro-life movement while addressing her colleagues in the Senate. “Today I feel like never before that I’m part of a wide sector of our people who defend life in general, from the moment of conception and until death,” she stated.

In March, as proceedings on the abortion bill began, Pope Francis had urged his homeland to “make a contribution in defense of life and justice.” Thanks to the integrity of Argentina’s pro-life senators, the country has done just that.

 

Nicholas Comerchero is a junior at Corban University, where he plans to complete his undergraduate degree in political science. Nicholas enjoys thinking, writing, and speaking about public policy and economics.